1990 fords

Margaret’s husband, Paul, bought the car from a neighbor when it was about a year old, in 1967. At the time he was a long-distance truck driver for Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach. Douglas drivers transported aircraft parts to various locations in the United States and missile parts to Cape Canaveral. Margaret was a computer programmer working for a bank, so it’s not surprising that she is social media active. Paul and Margaret had owned various sports cars since the mid 1950s and participated in rallies, slaloms, gymkhanas, and time trials over the years.

If you didn't know better, you could easily confuse Spence's hatch for a card-carrying member of the gears, pulleys, and filter crowd. But that would be a gross underestimate of the power lurking beneath the . Fibertrends 4-inch cowl hood. Even we could make money on the street in Spence's car (did we say that out loud?). But its main mission is to do battle on the dragstrips in Drag Radial action, especially in NMRA competition. For 2002, Spence finished third in points after a strong season in BFGoodrich Drag Radial. Doh! We almost forgot-Mmmm, Bogarts!

Ford had been trying to increase his factories’ productivity for years. The workers who built his Model N cars (the Model T’s predecessor) arranged the parts in a row on the floor, put the under-construction auto on skids and dragged it down the line as they worked. Later, the streamlining process grew more sophisticated. Ford broke the Model T’s assembly into 84 discrete steps, for example, and trained each of his workers to do just one. He also hired motion-study expert Frederick Taylor to make those jobs even more efficient. Meanwhile, he built machines that could stamp out parts automatically (and much more quickly than even the fastest human worker could).

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Ford had been trying to increase his factories’ productivity for years. The workers who built his Model N cars (the Model T’s predecessor) arranged the parts in a row on the floor, put the under-construction auto on skids and dragged it down the line as they worked. Later, the streamlining process grew more sophisticated. Ford broke the Model T’s assembly into 84 discrete steps, for example, and trained each of his workers to do just one. He also hired motion-study expert Frederick Taylor to make those jobs even more efficient. Meanwhile, he built machines that could stamp out parts automatically (and much more quickly than even the fastest human worker could).